Tag Archives: energy

What is beaty from Fengshui point of view

Dr Hsu Feng Shui Talk
#42: Beauty and the Ape

What is beauty? What is the experience of beauty?

Philosophers, both in the East and West, have tried to address this subject: in the West, Plato and Kant, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche and Hegel; in the East, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Chuang Tzu, and more recently Cai Yanpei, Wang Guowei, and Zhu Guangqian.

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Dr Hsu Fengshui talk 36

Dr Hsu Feng Shui Talk
#36: Looking at a Building is Like Looking at a Person

In an earlier article, we said that everything in the universe is composed of Chi. It has matter, Chi energy, and information (consciousness or thought). These three aspects exist together.

Chi energy can be recognized through form, that is, the material manifestation. Different forms manifest different Chi. When the form is wholesome, the Chi is wholesome.

Let’s look at the following drawings.

Geometrical Forms Fengshui

In the first row, the forms are wholesome: when we look at it, we feel comfortable.

In the second row, the forms are distorted rather than wholesome: it creates a less comfortable feeling.

This is also true in architecture. Let’s look at the following two buildings.

Fengshui House Pixabay

Image: Pixabay

Korea House from Archdaily

Image: Archdaily

The first is pleasing to the eye; the second is strange.

These different forms manifest different Chi, and transmit different information. The impact on the people who live in these buildings is also different.

In China, there is a long tradition of face-reading practice and has amassed a great body of knowledge. In ancient times, the Emperor usually cultivated the skill of face-reading. The great Qin Dynasty general, Zhen Guofan even wrote a face-reading book called Bing Jian.

Face-reading basically looks at the form of the facial features and assesses their character and personality. It also reads if a person will be rich or poor, noble or ordinary and so on.

In the same way, we can look at the “personality” of a house or building. Basically, we try to personify that building, and look at it as though it were a human. It then becomes possible to gain a sense of the personality of the building – cocky or humble, friendly or hospital, melancholy or lively. Just by looking at the outside, one can get a sense of the inside. When the outside is not good, one can be sure that there are problems inside as well. It might not provide full information, but it can provide basic clues about its nature.

So: we can read a house as we read a face. The secret is to take the house as a person, and then we can recognize who it is that we are looking at.

All Dr. Hsu talks on Feng Shui

Dr Hsu Fengshui talk 17 Four Features

Dr Hsu Feng Shui Talk
#17: Understanding the Four Features

Talks on Feng Shui with Dr. Hsu

17: Understanding the Four Features

Feng Shui study is the study of the quality, quantity, and the coordination, of the Four Features: Mountains, Water, Flat Land (Energy Spot), and Guardian Hills. Let’s discuss the quality and quantity of these features.

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Dr Hsu Fengshui talk 15 Concept

Dr Hsu Feng Shui Talk
#15: Form School 101 – Feng Shui Concept

Talks on Feng Shui with Dr. Hsu

15: Form School 101 – Feng Shui Concept

We have already discussed the basic concepts of Feng Shui. The diagram below summarizes these concepts in terms of the two pillars of thought that support Form School Feng Shui.

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Dr Hsu Fengshui talk 10

Dr Hsu Feng Shui Talk
#10: Feng Shui Masters – Can You See Chi?

Talks on Feng Shui with Dr. Hsu

10: Feng Shui Masters – Can You See Chi?

In my last posting (No. 9), we mentioned that the two pillars of Feng Shui are natural law and Chi monism. To talk about Feng Shui, then, we have to talk about Chi.

In Feng Shui site selection, an auspicious place is one with abundant Chi. However, since Chi has no form or image, how can we tell whether a place has abundant Chi? Without objective criteria, one person can say that the Chi of a place is good, and another person can say that it is bad. How can we judge who is right?

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Dr Hsu Fengshui talk 9

Dr Hsu Feng Shui Talk
#9: What is Chi?

Talks on Feng Shui with Dr. Hsu

9: What is Chi?

The two pillars of Feng Shui theory are natural law and chi monism. In Chinese, there are many terms that involve chi, like “chi si” (complexion), “chi li” (strength), “chi po” (spirits), and so on. In other words, the concept of chi is deeply embedded in the Chinese mind.

But what is chi? It cannot be touched, seen, or measured. Everyone seems to know it, but no one can put a finger on it.

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Climax is Only Half Way of the Journey

In the Yin Yang theory, everything – every process, every transformation, and every object – has both a Yin and a Yang aspect. The Yin and Yang energy roles represent different qualities: Yang energy manifests outwardly, and tends to be aggressive, dynamic, initiating and expansive. Yin energy reflects inward, and tends to be subtle, responsive, unseen and withdrawing.

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Personal Level Feng Shui

lotusWe often think of Feng Shui in terms of the environment, what is outside and around us.  Even though we may be aware that Feng Shui applies to every level of manifestation, from the smallest to the largest, it is still easy to miss a very important application that is very close to home, each and every person.

Let’s think this through.  The two pillars of Form School Feng Shui are Natural Laws and Chi.  The basic model for Form School design and analysis is the Four Feature Model.  In this model, the core features are called, Mountain, Guardian Hills, Energy Spot, and Water.  These four features are metaphors for Support, Protection, Growth and Expansion.  Any place w these four features manifest in an energetic and balanced way will have good energy that can nourish a good life.

These four features, when interpreted in terms of the qualities they represent, also indicate the qualities required for any successful human endeavor.  For example, a successful business venture will require the following: financial support of a bank or investors as well as the beneficial government policy (Mountain), the legal protection to safeguard against any mistake in operations (Guardian Hills), a good place for growth (Energy Spot), and a vast territory for expansion (Water).

But these features don’t just apply to our activities.  They apply to us, every person. In other words, they tell us something about what makes an ideal person.  The Mountain is the physical body, the necessary support for all activities. The Energy spot is the heart:  love and compassion are central to a good life.  The Guardian Hills are work and achievements, which provide sustenance and support.  A good heart without work and effective action is like a bird without wings.  The Water feature is the goal and purpose of life, which allows for forward and outward expansion.

In other words, ideally a person has a loving and compassionate heart; maintains a strong and healthy body, works well and diligently, and lives a meaningful life following some guiding goal.

Feng Shui is a guide to finding a place that has good energy and nourishes one’s life.  But it is also a guide to something even closer:  how to become the person that will live that life.

 

Square Table vs. Round Table

Is it better to have a round or square dining table?” In feng shui consultations, this is a frequently asked question. Naturally, which is better has a lot to do with the space; the surrounding furniture, the family structure, and the setting one is trying to create.

In consideration of any work, we always begin with the fundamental principles of yin and yang. What is dynamic and mobile is yang, while what is static and stable is yin. Hence, round shapes are yang and square or rectangular shapes are yin.

In applying Yin-Yang Principles, there are two considerations: Resonance and Balance.

According to the Principle of Resonance, if you are trying to create a yang environment you would use a round table. For a yin environment, you would use a square table.

In China, round dining tables are favored, while in the West, rectangular tables are more common. At a Chinese party, everything takes place around the dining table during dinner. This can be seen through the dynamic communal eating, the shared lazy susan, the host serving everyone and trying to push guests to eat more; people trying to out-drink each other, and everybody talking to everybody. This loud and lively event is very dynamic, very yang. A round table resonates with this situation, and it makes sense to use one.

In the West, a party begins with formal dining. People sit around a rectangular table, converse quietly with those who are immediately nearby, rather than with the whole table. More often, one helps themselves to food rather than being served. The atmosphere is more formal and calm, more yin. This resonates with the energy of a rectangular table. Funnily enough, Chinese parties often end when dinner is over, while Western parties begin when dinner is over.

For a small dining area, for efficient use of space, if the table has to rest against a solid wall, it’s better to use a square table and push one end against the wall. Since round tables resonate with yang energy, they are used in more open spaces. A square/rectangular table is more stable and calm, and good for long conversations. A round table provides a more dynamic atmosphere, and is better for fast chitchat. If you want your visitors to stay long, sit around a square table, otherwise, use a round table.

The shape of the table should also be taken into consideration when operating a business. Understanding resonance with space is important for business. For example, in a fast food restaurant, it’s good to use more yang features. These include more round and circular forms, as well as open and bright spaces. These yang characteristics affect people to eat quickly and leave quickly. On the other hand, for fine dining, people often wish to take their time to enjoy the food and conversation. In these situations, it is better to use more yin features, such as rectangular tables and dim light.

Balance is the other principle one must consider. It refers to the balance of yin and yang. In this situation we mean the balance of round and square tables. Even for a fast food restaurant, if all tables are round, the quality of the place becomes too yang, which is not ideal. Similarly, in a fancy dining setting, an excessively yin quality means that there is not enough flow in the setting.

Coffee shops like Starbucks use a lot of small round tables because they have solo customers in mind. With this type of set-up, there doesn’t seem to be any “empty” seats. Also, those having coffee alone don’t feel—or appear to be — lonely.

In environmental psychology, the round table is much more comfortable and informal for individuals, as well as groups of people, to sit at,” says Starbucks executive Rubinfeld. However, this is not necessarily true. It very much depends on why people are sitting there. Too many round tables could be excessively yang, and incite a restless, unstable feeling. If all tables in the room were round, the atmosphere will be very dynamic, but chaotic. Any sense of restfulness or comfort will be missing.

The key is balance, the balance of yin and yang. Whether a design should be weighted more in the yin or yang direction, is based on the nature of the business. But it should never be extreme. A restaurant may want to try to provide a comfortable atmosphere, but not so much that customers feel so relaxed and comfortable that they hang around forever.

The shape of a table is not only important for dining, it is also important for a business office. It affects efficiency and creativity.

Once I was invited to consult with an airplane company about the design of its new headquarters. I recommended using more yang features, such as round tables and more windows for spaces designated more for discussion and brain storming. For spaces designated for formal discussions, ceremonies, and signing of contracts, I recommended using rectangular tables and having fewer windows.

In summary, in any design, it is important to follow the highest guiding principles of Resonance and Balance with yin and yang.. And remember, the precise application of these principles depends on the effect one is trying to achieve.

Shan-tung Hsu
Blue Mountain Institute
shantunghsu@gmail.com